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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
and rwanda's support of congolese rebels. this is a little more than 2-1/2 hours. >> we will come to order and good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today's hearing will examine u.s. policy in the democratic republic of congo, this was exacerbated by rwanda's intervention in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda's support of militias who have ravaged and continue to plague this region. the state's--unable to testify at the sept. 19 hearing on this issue. the subcommittee promised to follow up was available to testify. the aftermath of the genocide, the administration turned a blind eye to reports of rwanda and plundering of resources from the d r c and support for rebels who have devastated eastern congo and its people. built over the clinton administration's causal failure responding effectively to the genocide in rwanda has led his subsequent u.s. administration being reluctant to criticize the government of rwanda. with these u.n. reports on that behavior, we must overcome our re
the opportunity meet with the president of rwanda. did the officials with whom you met with, did they meet, i should say, it's a dispute that? and went secretary sherman met with the president, some months back, several weeks back, did she get a report back from him? did he tell her this is all rubbish, not true? or did he admit to anything? secondly one of my most disappointed waste today, and marino i think are you out further on the suspension of foreign military financing that we're talking about on $200,000, when the 2006 act at least envision a more robust and credible sanctions against the country that is aiding and abetting that there is organizations like m23. so if you could speak to whether or not additional sanctions are under consideration at least against rwanda, and specific individuals as well. >> mr. chairman, let me ask, answer the first question. you were correct, as i stated earlier, i and my british and french colleagues met for several hours with the president, and we met for an extended period of time with the other president has was the foreign minister and prime minis
genocide in rwanda. they raped hundreds of women, chopping apart michildren, massacre of people. that's who the government is teaming up with. congo is really this -- it's like this caldron of abuse on a scale that's unlike just about anywhere else in the world. i cover a number of these conflicts in africa. just about everywhere else things are changing or getting a bit better in some cases. congo has stayed the same for almost ten years and that same is very disturbing state of anarchy. >> congo has enormous resources and the a beautiful lush country. >> it's spectacular. it's one of the most beautiful places i've been ever where. there was a huge volcano with streams of smoke shooting out of it. it's very lush. it's very fertile. the lakes are beautiful. the environment is clean. it's blessed with mineral riches, gold, timber, copper. just about everything. that's part of the reason why we're seeing this fight. the u.s. government has tried to get their hands around this by passing this resource conflict legislation that tries to get their arms around better regulating the minerals that
't suggest that everything is perfect in countries like uganda, and rwanda and ethiopia and south africa, but nonetheless, there's been progress in all these places, and we sometimes had to work with people who weren't perfect, but this author made it sound as if she was somehow guilty by association with anything they did wrong, and somehow had picked the wrong people to try to work with. i thought it was an absurd argument, and it sort of contributes to the same tone we've been hearing the last few weeks. >> well, there have been all these things coming out that people have been lobbing her way, and does this need to be resolved one way or the other? the president now we're told might even wait several more weeks before making decisions, not clear whether that's going to take place, but meanwhile, you have john kerry, who is going to be holding hearings on benghazi. hillary clinton is going to be testifying when that report comes out. we expect it by next week at the latest. that is the investigative panel, which will be turned over to the senate and house foreign affairs and foreign r
, and a generation whose inclination was not to intervene, which may have led to rwanda and 800,000 deaths, what lessons are you worried about people taking the wrong lessons from right now in the international arena? >> well, i think that we -- the lesson, i think, is that we do need to take action. the question is, what kind of action. and i am very interested in the way that syria is being approached. in terms of really using -- i teach a course on the national security toolbox. and we look at the various aspects of this, and what's happening is, the u.s. government and the international community is using the tools, operating internationally, getting international pressure, a variety of sanctions that are tighter and tighter. humanitarian assistance and saying that no options are off the table. so i know people talk about appeasement. it has nothing to do -- you know, assad may be a terrible, but he's not hitler. and it's not the same as when the western powers were basically trying to figure out how not to do anything over czechoslovakia, and here we really are trying to do something and be
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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